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New York residents with low income may seek child support changes

Income often plays a significant role in a person's ability to make necessary payments. If an individual is obligated to pay child support but has a low income, he or she may struggle to attend to that obligation. Unfortunately, unpaid support could lead to difficulties for all parties involved.

New York residents may be facing such hardships, and they are not alone. It was recently reported that one county in another state has amassed over $11 million in back child support. It was noted that many of those who have not made payments are not necessarily "deadbeats" but simply do not have the income to make the payments. Unfortunately, this could lead to custodial parents facing struggles of their own as they are unable to provide for the children without that support.

If individuals do not make payments, there is a chance that they could face serious repercussions. Six months in jail and fines are possible outcomes for these parties, and these sentences could further affect the situation in a negative manner. For instance, jail time could lead to a individual losing his or her job, which could result in an inability to make payments later. These outcomes could lead to a continuous cycle. As a result, individuals may feel at a loss when it comes to addressing their difficulties.

When individuals on low income need to make child support payments, they may think that simply not making the payments will help their financial situation. However, in order to avoid the potential pitfalls of such an action, New York residents may wish to find out about other options. Seeking modifications to support agreements could allow individuals to work toward a more manageable payment amount.

Source: ldnews.com, "County parents owe $11.4M in past-due child support", Daniel Walmer, Nov. 18, 2016

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