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Some New York parents may seek child support modifications

Being required to make child support payments is an obligation that many New York residents probably face. However, some parties may have a difficult time making their child support payments due to low income, unexpected expenses or other reasons. Some individuals may be able to request modifications to their payments in hopes of making them more manageable. However, individuals who do not make their payments could face severe consequences, including jail time. 

It was reported that a child support sweep recently took place in a nearby state. This sweep was conducted by law enforcement who worked toward locating parents who have not made support payments and taking them into custody. In two separate counties, 98 people were rounded up due to non-payment. In total, over $3 million was owed by those individuals.

In one county, the court collected over $37,000 in back support payments. It was unclear how much was collected in the second county. However, that amount is considerably lower than what was owed, and therefore, many of those parties who had not fulfilled their obligations could be at risk of severe punishment. It was not mentioned whether any punishments had been handed down at the time of the report. 

If individuals are struggling to make their payments due to personal issues, they may fear arrest or other punishment. If they believe that a change in their circumstances has made their child support agreement unreasonable, they may wish to consider seeking modifications. Information on how to work toward such changes in New York may help interested residents gain more agreeable terms. 

Source: northjersey.com, "Almost 100 arrested in North Jersey for not fulfilling child support obligations", Abbott Koloff, Feb. 9, 2016

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